Student Creative Works to Share Professional Spotlight

Michael J. Arvizu

“Eclipse” offers aspiring writings of fiction, plays and poetry the chance to be published in what is becoming one of the nation’s most prestigious community college literary publications.

The deadline is April 6 for entries in the publication’s 12th annual writing contest, with winners eligible to be published in the fall issue of the journal.

Evolving from an amateur publication to a professional-looking journal with a fancy art cover and professional binding, the Fall 2000 edition of “Eclipse” was the first issue to be nationally distributed — with submissions coming from all over the United States.

“Our goal is to get students motivated enough to recognize that they could be part of something like this,” said editor Bart Edelman. “We want to motivate students to become better writers.”

Though “Eclipse” has begun integrating the work of both professional and student writers, this year’s contest is especially designed to allow students to get started on a growing national publication.

“Eclipse” offers aspiring writings of fiction, plays and poetry the chance to be published in what is becoming one of the nation’s most prestigious community college literary publications.

The deadline is April 6 for entries in the publication’s 12th annual writing contest, with winners eligible to be published in the fall issue of the journal.

Evolving from an amateur publication to a professional-looking journal with a fancy art cover and professional binding, the Fall 2000 edition of “Eclipse” was the first issue to be nationally distributed — with submissions coming from all over the United States.

“Our goal is to get students motivated enough to recognize that they could be part of something like this,” said editor Bart Edelman. “We want to motivate students to become better writers.”

Though “Eclipse” has begun integrating the work of both professional and student writers, this year’s contest is especially designed to allow students to get started on a growing national publication.

“The best writers don’t necessarily have to come out of a university or some master of fine arts program someplace,” said associate editor Stephen Taylor. “There are good writers who may not have discovered their talent.”

The editorial staff of “Eclipse” is trying to fire up interest about the contest by going to classrooms and posting fliers around campus and by involving students in all aspects of production, from distribution to reading manuscripts.

This year’s contest is awarding $200 in prizes. However, Edelman is quick to point out that students shouldn’t see the cash prizes as the only reason to submit works. “It gives you a sense of pride in your work and that fact that you consider yourself to be a writer,” he said.

Writing should be submitted to Edelman’s office in LB 209. Students can submit up to five works of poetry and up to two works of fiction or drama.

“The best writers don’t necessarily have to come out of a university or some master of fine arts program someplace,” said associate editor Stephen Taylor. “There are good writers who may not have discovered their talent.”

The editorial staff of “Eclipse” is trying to fire up interest about the contest by going to classrooms and posting fliers around campus and by involving students in all aspects of production, from distribution to reading manuscripts.

This year’s contest is awarding $200 in prizes. However, Edelman is quick to point out that students shouldn’t see the cash prizes as the only reason to submit works. “It gives you a sense of pride in your work and that fact that you consider yourself to be a writer,” he said.

Writing should be submitted to Edelman’s office in LB 209. Students can submit up to five works of poetry and up to two works of fiction or drama.