La Tuna Blaze Contained

Vee Lind, Staff Writer

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La Tuna Blaze Contained

Fire devastates Glendale and surrounding communities

More than 7,000 acres were burnt in early September after a fire broke out it La Tuna Canyon, according to Los Angeles Fire Department officials. The fire harmed four homes and caused 10 non-significant injuries to people, officials said. It was one of the largest fires in the County in years, and affected Glendale and the surrounding community.

More than a thousand firefighters from all over California came to fight the La Tuna Fire. At least a hundred firefighters who were sent to Houston to help with the Hurricane Harvey recovery efforts came back to California to assist with the fire.

“We hit it hard, we hit it fast and we’ve done everything we can, and we’re proud to say out of those 1,400 homes, only five have been destroyed,” said Los Angeles Fire Department Capt. Erik Scott.

Six firefighters and one civilian suffered heat-related illnesses. One firefighter was treated for minor burns and one was treated for an eye injury, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

“There are rumors that Los Angeles firefighters are in need of donated food or supplies, such as blankets, toothpaste or soap. Nothing could be further from the truth,” said Public Service Officer and firefighter Brian Humphrey in a public statement. “We’re honored to be your Fire Department, and plan extensively to support those who proudly protect you, making sure they always have or can easily get all they need to remain battle ready.”

On social media, some members of the public had asked for supplies for firefighters following the Sept. 1 fire, but authorities stressed that the responding personnel were adequately prepared and were particularly concerned that members of the public thought they needed supplies.

The La Tuna blaze is now 100 percent contained.

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La Tuna Blaze Contained