Students Meet Colleges at Fair

MARIA KORNALIAN
El Vaquero Staff Writer

Fliers, pamphlets and brochures were displayed throughout Plaza Vaquero Oct. 30 when 70 colleges and universities participated in the fall semester’s transfer fair, allowing students to meet with representatives from different campuses.

The uniqueness of the transfer fair was that it offered students an opportunity for a one-on-one interview with representatives who were able to offer answers to personalized questions.

“It was helpful to receive specific information about which classes to take for each university you might be interested in,” said student Rachel Roos.

In fact, many students inquired about which classes they should be taking at the community college level in order to be as competitive as they can be for admissions into their schools of first choice.
“Most students want to know about the university’s major requirements for their major, deadlines for admissions, or if any of their majors are impacted by the budget crisis,” said UC Riverside representative, Sofia Hernandez.

Since many major programs require a different set of procedures and courses that are required, the transfer fair offered students an opportunity to get major-specific information.

Students are able to meet representatives who advised many on what route is best to take in order to maximize the chances of being offered admission to their prospective university.

“All of us are just hoping to offer transfer students some options,” said University of La Verne representative Melissa A. Koers.

“Oftentimes, students think they can only apply to a UC or CSU because that’s all they know, and by coming to something like this, they can get a wide variety of options.”

Universities from the CSU system, private schools across the country and each UC campus were represented, offering information to prospective students regarding a variety of issues concerning admissions as transfer studnets, housing options, and cost of tuition.

Bhanu Anton Cruz, the representative from USC, let students know what the university was looking for when determining admissions for transfers. “We want the student to have a little more depth to them and their program,” she said. “We are looking for a well-rounded and academically prepared student for USC.”

Hector Sanchez, a counselor intern at the Transfer Center, emphasized the importance of the transfer fair and the benefits students receive when they attend.

“The representatives from the different schools give you an opportunity to know someone from the campus,” said Sanchez.

He explained the importance of students creating links with representatives from their prospective schools and how the transfer fair allows for those relationships to be made.

The size of the fair has also significantly increased from past years.
According to the Transfer Center’s adviser, Sarkis Ghazarian, three years ago there were only about 30 schools represented in the fair. Now, that number has more than doubled.

Ghazarian also encouraged students to attend the fairs where they can “find out about the opportunities that are available.”