‘Company’ Shows All Sides of Marriage

JENNA HUGHES
State Hornet
Sacramento State University

Everyone knows one friend who, despite the fact that all of his or her friends are married or attached, still isn’t in a steady relationship.

In “Company,” the musical by Stephen Sondheim and George Furth, that friend is not only single but he just turned 35.

Robert, the bachelor whose friends are all married, is dating three girls all of whom seem right for him. And yet, Robert says he isnt avoiding marriage marriage is avoiding him.

The fun begins as the antics of Roberts married friends relationships play out. From Sarah and Harry, who both deny that they are on diets, to Amy and Paul, an engaged couple stressing through wedding plans, all of Roberts friends have their issues, but still remain in love.

Laughs abound as you watch David and Jenny, another couple who are Roberts friends, get high off of Robert’s marijuana. Amy’s neurotic attitude during the preparation of her wedding, or the lack thereof, has the audience hooting.

While the production is amusing and funny, it still deals with a concept that many people face: What does marriage do to a person?

Robert, through his various dates and interactions with his friends, goes on a journey of discovery to find out. By looking at the world around him and looking into his own heart, he finally begins to realize that marriage is more about having someone who allows you to be alive rather than just being devoted to one person.

What makes it delightful is that its true, said Wilma White, an audience member who was laughing midway into the show.

The actors in “Company” arent necessarily singers who could perform operas or concerts, but they dont need to be.

You need someone who sounds real and they are, said Rita Tyk, Associated Students Inc. board associate.

Ed Brazo, the director of the production and associate professor of musical theatre at Sacramento State, said that the Sondheim productions are very difficult.

It was something we wanted the students to experience, Brazo said.

Experience was something that the actors had because some of them had performed in productions for the Music Circus and others for various theater companies.

The acting never seemed strained but the nerves of opening night was sometimes heard in their voices.

The only real rough spot in the production seemed to be at the break between the first and second half. The ending of the first half was a little abrupt, startling the audience with a sudden end and the house lights coming back on.

Overall, “Company” is definitely a production worth seeing.

Jenna Hughes can be reached at [email protected]