You Know You Want it, Nirvana’s Greatest Hits

isa Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief
(The Pacifican)

It’s not very often that a band comes along and turns the music industry upside down and inside out. That’s exactly what Nirvana did when they released their second album “Nevermind” in 1991. Nirvana was probably the most influential contemporary rock band to hit the mainstream masses.

Twelve years later, Nirvana fans have finally received what they have been waiting for, a greatest hits album. “Nirvana” was released on October 29, 2002 and contains the previously unreleased track, “You Know You’re Right.” Listening to this song is bittersweet because it showed that Nirvana had so much more to offer.

The rest of the album demonstrates the growth of Nirvana, including a song off of their first album, “Bleach,” called “About A Girl.” A live cover of David Bowie’s song “The Man Who Sold the World” is the last song on the album. Bowie would be proud of the way that Cobain rendered the song, which is about rock stardom and selling out.

The trio killed the careers of hair bands such as Poison and Twisted Sister with their raw, scorching sound, and kicked Michael Jackson off the charts. Rock was back and it had a message.

Nirvana didn’t conform to mainstream ideals. Kurt Cobain’s defiant attitude came across in his lyrics, guitar playing and stage presence. His aloofness was reminiscent of Jim Morrison from The Doors in that he just wanted to make good music, to hell with his popularity.

He pissed off homophobes by sometimes wearing dresses and make-up during his performances. Nirvana’s slacker style became the fad of a generation, grunge was cool and it was hip to have holes in your jeans and to wear the same flannel shirt every day.

The death of Kurt Cobain was a devastating blow to every one that he touched and inspired. It cast a shadow over the music world, which has yet to lift and fade away. You only have to look at what is “hot” right now: cute boy and girl bands that were formed by producers. Where is the artistic and creative integrity that the early 90’s was blessed with? But great music seems to come in waves, so hope isn’t lost yet.