Collegiate NewsOn Campus Living a Must for 2005 Freshmen

AMY JENKINS
(The Johnsonian)

In
years past, Winthrop University has been trying to get its students immersed in
campus life and activities.  For the entering class of 2005 the
university is taking this concept one step further by requiring freshmen to live
on campus.

Cindy Cassens, director of Residence Life, says this change is just another part
of several changes being made to provide freshmen with a chance to become fully
engrossed in Winthrop life.

“This
change is being made as part of the overall freshmen experience. There
are new general education requirements and academic success halls and this
change will give freshmen a more well-rounded experience,” Cassens said.

Winthrop
already houses approximately 90 percent of its freshmen class. According
to Cassens it shouldn’t be hard to find a place to live for the extra
students.

“We’ve
been overcrowded the last few years.  In the past we’ve offered
upperclassmen private rooms; next year they may not be able to have private
rooms,” Cassens said.

In
actuality, the university will not have to find an enormous amount of space. Some
freshmen will be exempt from this new rule. In a news release by the
university, allowances will be made for students who are married or
non-traditional-age freshmen and for those living with parents and commuting
from 50 or fewer miles away.

Freshmen
Katie Osheal, a nutrition major, said the residence halls are not the most
glamorous, and some of the aides are less than perfect, but that living on
campus is an experience that helps freshmen to adapt.

“Living
on campus really enhances your experience,” Osheal said.

Mary
McMeans, a sophomore, says that she can see how living on campus would help, but
she would not want to live here.

“It
would probably help [the students] learn where things are and be more
involved,” said McMeans.

Frank
Ardaiolo,Vice President of Student Life, said that the new change is intended to
help students get the most from their college experience.

According
to Ardaiolo, research shows that the residence hall experience is one of the
most significant experiences students can have; it directly engages them in
positively developing along personal, behavioral and cognitive domains.

Ardaiolo
said, “The new policy provides a means for learning beyond the traditional
classroom and will better allow us to ensure Winthrop students will become
leaders in their professions and leaders in their communities.

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