Charles Aznavour, the French Pop Deity

France's Frank Sinatra receives his Hollywood star

Rachel Melikian, Contributing Writer

It took 70 years for French-Armenian singer Charles Aznavour to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Many Armenians, Europeans and Middle Easterners grew up listening to Aznavour’s with their parents and grandparents, as his career took off alongside that of Edith Piaf and Maurice Chevalier.

In America, Aznavour, often called Europe’s Frank Sinatra, sang a duet with Old Blue Eyes, “You Make Me Feel So Young.” Aznavour’s career is a testament to his talent and charm. It’s why at an unbelievable 93 years of age, he was also given a “symbolic key” of Los Angeles by Sen. Kevin De Leon on the the eve of his concert during a ceremony to receive his star.

The senator welcomed the legendary musical icon with great honor and stated that Aznavour “is truly, truly one of the greatest living entertainers with an artistic career that spans eight decades.”

Aznavour was born Shahnour Varinag Aznavourian in Paris to Armenian parents. He has sold more than 100 million records across 80 countries.

“I am very honored and very happy with what is happening today,” he said in Hollywood. “I am thankful to America for each time [it] receives me with open arms,” Aznavour said to fans and reporters at the event.

Aznavour is also respected for his humanitarian work in Armenia following the 1988 earthquake that killed tens of thousands of people. He received his Armenian citizenship in 2008 and was later appointed to be Armenia’s ambassador to Switzerland a year later. He is also the Permanent Mission of Armenia to the United Nations in Geneva.


Aznavour “has sung for presidents, popes, and royalty” and continues to successfully triumph in his career that takes him around the globe. From Antwerp, Belgium to Tel Aviv, Israel, Aznavour has captured the hearts of many across generations, social stratas, races, and religions.