Forest Lawn Hosts Exhibition of Disney Artist Eyvind Earle

MUSEUMS AND MAUSOLEUMS: “Sleeping Beauty” artist Eyvind Earle is the featured artist at Forest Lawn’s hilltop museum.

Elena Jacobson

MUSEUMS AND MAUSOLEUMS: “Sleeping Beauty” artist Eyvind Earle is the featured artist at Forest Lawn’s hilltop museum.

Elena Jacobson, Staff Writer

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Most people think Forest Lawn is only a place for the dead, but the cemetery actually strives to make it a place for the living.

One of the largest collections of stained glass in the world is housed in the museum, and there are artworks displayed throughout the grounds. In the museum’s most recent exhibit, the art derives from Eyvind Earle, a background painter for the Walt Disney Co.

“It is an honor to inherit a legacy of an organization that is so involved with the community,” Ann Pescalor, the museum’s director said.  “Our aim is to enrich, inspire, and educate.”

Coupled with each painting are poems written by Earle, which illustrate a glimpse into his mind when creating his artwork. Earle wrote alongside the bronze statue of a horse he sculpted, “Art is… to pick one detail out of infinitude of infinities and make it clear.”

Ava Nguyen, an aspiring illustrator and attendee of the exhibit, is benefiting from all three of the museum’s goals.

“It is great chance to see some of the artwork up close,” Nguyen said. “The poetry works with the concepts of the paintings”

It was only last year that Earle was awarded the title of a Disney Legend. The Disney Legend award is a of hall of fame that celebrates great contributions to the Disney company over the years. It is because of this award that the museum showcased an exhibit of his art.

His work on the castle featured in the film  “Sleeping Beauty” is how he achieved his award. While he is known best for his work with Disney, Earle has done many other oil paintings and sketches, many of which have not been seen outside the exhibit. He has done so many paintings that the museum rotates out some of the pieces, so the exhibit is different each time.

The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m to 5 p.m. The exhibit runs until Jan. 1 and is free to the public.

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